Ag Energy Analysis for

Adair County, IA

Quick Stats

Annual Ag Production Energy Cost

$23.7 Million

Annual Energy Use (MMBtu)

8.37 Million

Annual CO2E Emissions from Energy (metric tons)

72,271

Land Area (acres)

364,333

Farm Operations (2012 Ag Census)

726

Crop Production ($19.3 Million)

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Acres Harvested

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Energy Cost by Crop

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Energy Cost by Category

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Energy use per Acre
Field Operations, Fertilizer Use, and Drying Requirements per Acre

Data source: Iowa State University Extension

USDA/NASS Data
All Statistics for Adair County, IA

Data source: USDA Ag Census, NASS Survey

Tillage Assumptions

Data source: Not available. Customize this value below.

Rotation Assumptions

Data source: Not available. Customize this value below.

Livestock Production ($4.45 Million)

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Livestock Inventories

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Annual Energy Cost

About the Math
Energy use per Head

Electricity, Heating, and Diesel Costs per Head

USDA/NASS Data
All Statistics for Adair County, IA

Data source: USDA Ag Census, NASS Survey

Economic and Stewardship Opportunities

Selecting the right amount of tillage is a critical decision for farm energy use and profitability. Similar to other farm management decisions such as nitrogen fertilizer use for corn, or ventilation rate in a livestock confinement, overuse wastes energy but underuse can lower profitability.

A key is to carefully consider potential for gross revenue returns to tillage operations, (i.e., crop yield), in comparison to fuel, labor, and machinery costs for doing tillage. Put another way, are tillage passes beyond a no-till management scheme returning costs of fuel, labor, and machinery that are required of the tillage?

Tillage Practice Assumptions

Enter the overall percentage of crops using the following tillage practices:

Rotation Practice Assumptions

Enter the overall percentage of corn using the following rotation practices:

Please provide valid input.

Energy efficiency improvements and on-site solar are viable options for most farmers. More efficient lighting, pumps, and motors can lead to a 20% reduction in electricity use, and solar panels installed on-farm can generate 30-50% of the electricity used in livestock production and/or grain drying.

Electrical Efficiency Savings

Enter the percentage of electric energy savings through energy efficiency measures and on-site solar (e.g., 20% savings):

%